Extra Virgin Olive Oil Nutritional Facts

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Nutritional Facts

Olive oil is a liquid fat derived from olives, a traditional tree plant of the Mediterranean basin, made by pressing whole olives and extracting the oil. It is commonly used in cooking, frying, or as a salad dressing.

Olive oil, more specifically “extra virgin olive oil”, is known as one of the healthiest foods you can eat due to its association with the Mediterranean diet.

Olive oil has been consumed by humans for thousands of years and is a staple in the Mediterranean diet and European cuisine. It contains no carbohydrates or proteins. All of its calories come from fat, mostly monounsaturated fat, which is good for you, making it a nutritious addition to your diet.

Olive oil can vary in color and taste. Whether it's called virgin, extra virgin, or pure depends on how acidic it is and how much it's been processed. Unlike oils that are extracted from a seed, nut, or grain, olive oil is extracted from the fruit itself.

Nutritional values of extra virgin olive oil

One tablespoon of olive oil (14g) provides 119 calories, 0g protein, 0g carbohydrate, and 14g fat. Olive oil is a good source of vitamins E and K and contains traces of potassium. The following nutritional information is provided by the USDA.

Calories: 119
Fat: 14g
Sodium: 0.3 mg
Carbohydrates: 0g
Fiber: 0g
Sugar: 0 g
Protein: 0 g
Vitamin E: 1.9 mg
Vitamin K: 8.1 mcg
Potassium: 0.1 mg

 

Carbohydrates


Olive oil contains no carbohydrates.

 

Fats


A tablespoon of olive oil contains 9.86 grams of monounsaturated fat, 1.42 grams of polyunsaturated fat, and 1.86 grams of saturated fat. Although much of the fat is benign, it is still beneficial to control your intake as it is high in calories.

Protein in extra virgin olive oil


Olive oil contains no protein.

Vitamins and minerals in extra virgin olive oil


A tablespoon of olive oil contains about 1.9 milligrams of vitamin E. Vitamin E helps keep our cells healthy by protecting them from free radicals while boosting immunity and preventing blood from clotting in the blood vessels.


The same amount of olive oil also contains 8.1 micrograms of vitamin K. This vitamin plays a role in many functions including blood clotting, bone metabolism, and bone mineralization.


Consuming olive oil provides trace amounts of potassium, about 0.1 milligrams per tablespoon. Potassium supports healthy kidney and heart function; It also plays an active role in muscle contraction.

 

Calories in Extra Virgin Olive Oil


A tablespoon of olive oil contains 119 calories, making it a high-calorie food. Reducing the amount to a teaspoon drops the calorie count by about two-thirds, or closer to 40 calories per serving.

 

Summary


Olive oil is high in fat, but it's the type of fat that's been linked to better health. It also provides the body with some important nutrients, namely vitamin E, vitamin K and trace amounts of potassium.

Known for its rich flavor, versatility, and health benefits, extra virgin olive oil is an excellent ingredient to keep in your kitchen cupboard.

Olive Oil Nutritional Values: What Do You Get From 1 Tablespoon?

This is contained in olive oil:

Olive oil is a pure fat but a healthy fat according to the US Department of Agriculture's MyPlate guidelines, meaning it contains no protein or carbohydrates (including fiber or sugar). Most fat is heart-healthy monounsaturated fat, with a small amount of polyunsaturated and saturated fat. One plus of using fat in cooking—particularly vegetables—is that the fat helps your body absorb fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E, and K from the meal.

What studies suggest about the health benefits of olive oil

Olive oil is widely recognized as one of the best fats you can eat, especially for heart health. In a May 2014 study published in the journal BMC Medicine, which looked at more than 7,200 women over the age of 55 who were at high risk of heart disease, those who consumed the most olive oil of any type as part of a Mediterranean diet increased up to 35 percent and 48 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, respectively, compared to those who consumed the least amount of oil. (14) For every 10g of extra virgin olive oil (nearly 1 tablespoon) consumed daily, there was a 10 percent reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease and a 7 percent reduction in death from cardiovascular disease.

MORE ABOUT HEART DISEASE PREVENTION

It may be that the MUFAs, chemicals called phenols, and vitamin E in olive oil are cardioprotective. The oil is also known to be anti-inflammatory and may improve blood vessel function and improve cholesterol and insulin sensitivity and lower high blood pressure, the researchers point out. But some perspective: Olive oil is just one part of a healthy Mediterranean diet. Other foods that are heavily consumed throughout the diet, including fruits and vegetables, nuts, and legumes, are also known to promote heart health.​

How olive oil is made?

Olive oil is made from olives that grow on olive trees, mostly in the Mediterranean region. After harvesting, olives are ground into a paste and then decanted and subjected to a centrifugation process to separate the olive oil. The final product is then stored in oxygen-protected stainless steel tanks. When bottling, the olive oil should be placed in a dark glass bottle to keep it fresh.

Olive oil is made from olives that grow on olive trees, mostly in the Mediterranean region. After harvesting, olives are ground into a paste and then decanted and subjected to a centrifugation process to separate the olive oil. The final product is then stored in oxygen-protected stainless steel tanks. When bottling, the olive oil should be placed in a dark glass bottle to keep it fresh.